Texas governor calls for investigation into ‘anti-American’ tweets

UPDATED at 10:52 p.m.

ET Monday: Texas Gov.

Greg Abbott is calling for an investigation into tweets that his state’s largest newspaper says have disparaged President Donald Trump.

Abbott tweeted on Sunday that his newspaper’s coverage of Trump’s response to Hurricane Harvey was “sickening” and that the paper should “review the tone of its editorial.”

“It is clear to me that our paper is not a news organization,” Abbott said Monday in a statement.

“In light of this and other recent statements by Mr. Trump, we need to ask ourselves if we are in fact a news outlet, or if we simply repeat what our leaders say in the press.” “

The Texas Tribune has also received reports of similar messages that appeared in its pages last week. “

In light of this and other recent statements by Mr. Trump, we need to ask ourselves if we are in fact a news outlet, or if we simply repeat what our leaders say in the press.”

The Texas Tribune has also received reports of similar messages that appeared in its pages last week.

Abbott said in his statement that the newspaper was “committed to a robust and independent journalism” and the company’s editorial team would review “all content.”

A spokesman for the newspaper did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Abbott was the top GOP presidential candidate in 2016, and he was a candidate for governor in 2018.

The Texas governor said his tweets were taken out of context and did not mean to demean the president.

The tweets were first reported by the conservative blog RedState.com.

“I’m very sorry if this offended anyone, but this is just not news,” Abbott tweeted.

“You should call your newspaper.

I am not sure what their message is, but that is my opinion, and they should know that.”

The tweets appeared to be taken out on Saturday, according to the RedState post.

The newspaper is owned by The Associated Press, a division of the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research, which has been critical of the Trump administration’s handling of the hurricane response.

The AP said Monday that it had reviewed the tweets and found they did not represent its editorial judgment.

The paper’s general manager for news and politics, Steve Jones, told the Associated White House Correspondents Association that he did not know the exact nature of the tweets but that they were taken in context.

“The tweets were in the context of a story about the AP newsroom and the AP story,” Jones said.

“What we saw is a story being reported in the media and it was being taken out in the way it was.”

He said that “it is our policy to not comment on our own coverage of the AP.”

The AP, which also owns The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Today, The Wall Street Journal and The Los Angeles Times, has been under fire in recent weeks after several stories about the Trump White House’s ties to Russia were published.